Business modelling in lesser times…

A lot of business models are known:

  • Brokerage
  • Advertising
  • Infomediary
  • Merchant
  • Manufacturer (Direct)
  • Affiliate
  • Community
  • Subscription
  • Utility

Yet you still have to get to the point where you can say… this is it! That’s where Alexander Osterwalder has created a good method to define your business model.

Slideshare Slideset

Continue reading “Business modelling in lesser times…”

Out Cold

sneezeEven the best of us get sick sometimes… and so do I! 😉 Yet this post isn’t for pitty sake but to share a bit of knowledge I did not know before. The term “common cold” doesn’t have the “cold” as a cause. Neither heat or cold makes you get a “common cold“, but it’s a pure viral infection. The reason why it’s called this way, is because people tend to stay more inside during colder weather. This increases the infection rate as people are crowded into “small spaces”.

The 3 kinds of free models

Logic+Emotion featured an article called Visualizing Chris Anderson’s “Free” Model.

  • Free 1 : Kinda like the concept often used by Telecom operators. Buy a subscription and get the mobile phone for free. (Too bad this concept isn’t allowed by law in Belgium…. “Koppelverkoop”)
  • Free 2 : The concept where the whole web 2.0 is running towards… Offer something for free to your community, but let an external party pay for their “subscription” by means of advertising.
  • Free 3 : Shareware meets web 2.0… Get a limited version for free, but pay for the premium version.

You might also want to read the original article

How much is a lottery ticket worth?


Let’s say you could win 1 million Euro when participating with a lottery. The odds are about 1 to a billion… How much would you pay for this lottery ticket?

Now let’s say that you’re in a lottery where you have a one-out-of-a-billion chance to lose 5% of all your assets. How much would you pay for a lottery ticket which insures you against this?

What you already have is worth more to you than what you might gain. Yet the same math & currency value applies to both gaining and losing. People tend to panic when there is a risk of losing something, despite how small it may be. Every change is seen as a potential loss and not a potential win.

A trader takes several risks on a daily basis, yet (s)he knows/judges the odds of every investement. Let’s say that they have a win ratio of 8 out of 10. When they invest their money into 10 opportunities, they should anticipate that 8 winners exceed the losses made at the two failed investments.

So how do you respond to risks? Do you fear or anticipate them?

TrueCrypt secures your information

What’s TrueCrypt? It’s a free open-source disk encryption software for Windows Vista/XP, Mac OS X, and Linux. It’s main features include:

  • Creates a virtual encrypted disk within a file and mounts it as a real disk.
  • Encrypts an entire partition or storage device such as USB flash drive or hard drive.
  • Encrypts a partition or drive where Windows is installed (pre-boot authentication).
  • Encryption is automatic, real-time (on-the-fly) and transparent.
  • Encryption algorithms: AES-256, Serpent, and Twofish. Mode of operation: XTS.

I use it for my usb sticks. I encrypt a part of the disk (about 50%) where I use the encrypted part for my sensitive information and the “public” part for non-sensitive information. After using it for about two months, I can assure you that’s it’s relativily easy to use for security software. It provides you with a tool to secure your data in a simple manner.

Multitasking gets you nowhere or does it?

Lifehacker just featured an article called “Debunking The Myth of Multitasking“.

In a fast-paced business culture of “get everything done yesterday,” it’s easy to admire and reward those busybusy people who always seem to be juggling 14 things at once. But business coach Dave Crenshaw argues that the most common kind of multitasking doesn’t boost productivity–it slows you down.

I kinda forget the reference for this, but a while ago I read that, with each interruption, the brain will need about 15 minutes to get all things in order again. This so that you’re at the same situation that you were when you were interrupted.