Azure File Share : Issue mounting outside of the Azure region from Ubuntu Linux

Today I was setting up a deployment with two hosts ;

  • One in West Europe (“WE”)
  • One in North Europe (“NE”)

The objective was to have a shared mountpoint between both. So I created a storage account in the region West Europe. In this storage account I created a file share, and mounted it on to the VM located in WE. Though when using the exact same config in NE, I got the following error message ;

2016-03-30 13_49_01-kvaes@rancherne0_ ~

mount error(13): Permission denied
Refer to the mount.cifs(8) manual page (e.g. man mount.cifs)

Continue reading “Azure File Share : Issue mounting outside of the Azure region from Ubuntu Linux”

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OpenSource Storage Management

I came across OpenFiler a while ago and was intriged by it. Now I’ve taken the liberty to testing it in my lab, and I must say that I’m impressed by the features. It’s something every sysadmin should check out to see if it isn’t a viable solution for their overpriced storage solution… 😉

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Openfiler is a powerful, intuitive browser-based network storage software distribution. Openfiler delivers file-based Network Attached Storage and block-based Storage Area Networking in a single framework. Its uses the rPath Linux metadistribution and is distributed as a stand-alone Linux distribution. The entire software stack interfaces with third-party software that is all open source.

File-based networking protocols supported by Openfiler include: NFS, SMB/CIFS, HTTP/WebDAV and FTP. Network directories supported by Openfiler include NIS, LDAP (with support for SMB/CIFS encrypted passwords), Active Directory (in native and mixed modes) and Hesiod. Authentication protocols include Kerberos 5.

Openfiler includes support for volume-based partitioning, iSCSI (target and initiator), scheduled snapshots, resource quota, and a single unified interface for share management which makes allocating shares for various network file-system protocols a breeze.

Find out who is monopolizing or eating the CPUs

When you need to determine which process is monopolizing or eating the CPUs. Following command will displays the top 10 CPU users on the Linux system.

ps -eo pcpu,pid,user,args | sort -k 1 -r | head -10

or

ps -eo pcpu,pid,user,args | sort -r -k1 | less

Output
%CPU PID USER COMMAND
96 2148 vivek /usr/lib/vmware/bin/vmware-vmx -C /var/lib/vmware/Virtual Machines/Ubuntu 64-bit/Ubuntu 64-bit.vmx -@ ""
0.7 3358 mysql /usr/libexec/mysqld --defaults-file=/etc/my.cnf --basedir=/usr --datadir=/var/lib/mysql --user=mysql --pid-file=/var/run/mysqld/mysqld.pid --skip-locking --socket=/var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock
0.4 29129 lighttpd /usr/bin/php
0.4 29128 lighttpd /usr/bin/php
0.4 29127 lighttpd /usr/bin/php
0.4 29126 lighttpd /usr/bin/php
0.2 2177 vivek [vmware-rtc]
0.0 9 root [kacpid]
0.0 8 root [khelper]

If you’re interested in more information on Linux CPU utilization then check out the related article on nixCraft here.

Which is the greenest; disks or flash?

In his latest blog post, Anything But a Flash in the Pan, Jonathan Schwartz. touches a good point… We have RAM memory for “on the fly” memory and hard drivers to have persistent storage. Yet flash memory could (let me stand corrected; WILL) be used as a middle way option. Put apart the commercial notes (links towards Sun & ZFS), and you’ll probably find it an interesting read like me.

There are only two kinds of storage devices – those that have failed, and those that are about to fail. That’s the view most data centers have about the traditionally mechanical devices pejoratively referred to as “spinning rust.” All disk drives fail, cheap drives fail faster.

DevWork’s Ten Essential Linux Tricks

Learn these 10 tricks and you’ll be the most powerful Linux® systems administrator in the universe…well, maybe not the universe, but you will need these tips to play in the big leagues. Learn about SSH tunnels, VNC, password recovery, console spying, and more. Examples accompany each trick, so you can duplicate them on your own systems.

Lazy Linux: 10 essential tricks for admins

How to be a more productive Linux systems administrator

  • Trick 1: Unmounting the unresponsive DVD drive
  • Trick 2: Getting your screen back when it’s hosed
  • Trick 3: Collaboration with screen
  • Trick 4: Getting back the root password
  • Trick 5: SSH back door
  • Trick 6: Remote VNC session through an SSH tunnel
  • Trick 7: Checking your bandwidth
  • Trick 8: Command-line scripting and utilities
  • Trick 9: Spying on the console
  • Trick 10: Random system information collection